THE SEQUEL

When I started the second book (which is actually in editing right now) I had to really give it some thought. Did I research anything about trilogies or the second book after the first is done? No. Why not? Okay, cause I’m just thinking of that right now.

At the end of the first book there’s a hook to draw the reader into wanting to know where the story is headed. It made sense to do that, however the hook does not end with my hero, but rather on the villain.  I didn’t want to have Chapter 1 be about the bad guy and I knew that the first opening to any book needed to draw the reader into the story. I examined a chapter or two I had removed during the first re-write of book 1 to see if any of those would work. They didn’t fit right. I wanted to start with something jarring or at least alarming enough for the reader to want to find out what was taking place.

I returned to a small booklet, written by Aaron D. Gansky about first line hooks. In this book he talks about writing a perfect first line. This could also be a whole paragraph, but it sets the tone and often determines if someone is going to read your book.

Gansky  refers to five things from Professor Steve Heller, that an opening line should do:

1. Capture the Reader’s attention without sensationalizing the subject

2. Create a feeling of movement (establish conflict)

3. Establish tone, mood, and/or situation

4. Create an initial impression of a character

5. Establish the story’s voice

After reading this book, I returned to the first book and re-wrote the opening paragraph. It also helped me on beginning my second book which starts this way:

 Antonio growled. It was a low, cautionary growl that woke me—clear headed. Hyper-vigilant, I listened in the dark. My heartbeat quickened and I shuddered. Antonio Banderas, my large Scooby Doo type dog, had been sleeping on the end of my bed, facing the French doors. I could make out his head, his ears raised. Moonlight flowed through the curtains and I lifted the light blanket off as I sat up— ready to run if I had to.

Here’s a link to another site of first lines that further illustrates examples of memorable first lines that makes the reader take notice. http://thewritepractice.com/first-line

Grabbing an idea as it floats by…

Like a lot of people, I’m sure, I frequently thought I’d like to write a book some day. As life moved along and I shared mine with close friends, I began to hear phrases like, “You should write a book”, or That should be in a book!” I don’t know about you, but when I heard people say that to me, my first thought was, I don’t have anything interesting to write about. I used to think, I haven’t acquired enough knowledge, or my life is too ordinary, I can’t imagine anyone reading what i would write about.

Eventually, I took a few online classes and programs and the phrase I always heard was, “Write about What you Know.” If that was too tough, you could ,”Write about something you’d like to know about.” I knew about psychology, family, relationships, and marriage. I had degrees in that area so I finally wrote a non-fiction book. Once it was done, I had very little interest in it and wanted to move on to something else.

I had friends who wrote fiction, but I never thought I would. I was completely convinced that I was just not creative enough to do that. So when I decided to give it a try, it started with me thinking, if I could write what holds my interest enough that I would actually feel some passion writing about, maybe I could come up with something. I thought about what I like to read. I enjoy (among a number of other categories) dystopian novels. I’m not sure why. I don’t want to be a survivalist. I sure don’t want to have to be. I just thought it would be interesting to think about life happening in a whole different setting.

I liked Hunger Games and Divergent. I read others that didn’t have the same prominence and enjoyed them, too. But I didn’t want my world, the one I wrote about, to be dark or negative. I wanted it to be hopeful, happy, funny at times. I wanted there to be beauty and darkness just so the light side would triumph. The paranormal, supernatural, mystical, I also loved.

I knew about the parallel dimension theory. Not because I was smart enough to take a course in Physics (which I wish now I had), but then again, maybe it would have limited my imagination if I did know the boundaries that such knowledge would have imposed on me. I also didn’t have much knowledge of branches of the military, the art of war, robotics, certain technology, space or federal organizations like the FBI, CIA, DARPA, NSA or even sheriff’s departments. And yet, they all showed up.

The way it began for me was a thought. I want to write about a parallel dimension. I had no idea beyond that.

Being a Writer…

I have several blogs floating around, but none that I am drawn to actively visit or post on. Maybe starting this one will encourage me to keep up with others. I decided to start one for Dimension Norraena because I’m really excited about this story. I wanted to keep a record of   how I started and how and where the ideas came, what worked for me and what didn’t. I’m hoping that other people might read of my adventures and efforts and feel insprired to try writing themselves or at least be amused by my foibles and successes. Maybe you can add some of your own if you’re a writer, too.

I hope when you drop by and read anything that piques your interest that you’ll say hello and add your ideas, thoughts or questions and maybe an interchange of dialog will be interesting to read.

Thanks so much for stopping. It means a lot to me.